In modern culture, there are countless popular myths that everyone subscribes to that are not always 100% accurate. While many of them are and can be a good thing, there are certainly many outdated modes of thinking that hold people back. This is also true when it comes to learning a musical instrument like the piano. Students who are serious about becoming great piano players can get caught up in learning “correct” technique. The desire to play music the “correct” way is understandable, but somewhat misguided. In this article we will dismiss the myth that you should learn proper piano technique before you begin to pay music on the piano.

Amongst musicians, there is the age-old debate of whether physical technique and accuracy is as necessary as a player’s interpretation and expression of a musical piece. While technique is certainly important, what’s most important is the music that’s produced as the end-result so the answer to this question is most certainly. No!

Another question to ask is whether playing technique and perfect note-accuracy takes longer to learn than to interpret a piece of music well and express yourself when playing it. The answer again is a resounding No! We are comparing apples and oranges here, peaches and pears. Both skills mentioned above take a lot of time to master. Probably the best way to improve your interpretation and expressiveness is via repertoire. In fact it is not unheard of in some countries for music students to practice repetitive drills for many years before they are even allowed to attempt to play a piece of music! When they do the student is allowed to play repertoire, however the result is that these musicians end up playing fast and accurately with almost no expression! Is this really a big surprise?

Probably the most effective way to study music on the piano is to practice playing music as you practice fingering technique and playing accuracy. The ideal way is that the difficulty of a technique should be harder than what is required of the repertoire. This way you are always pushing yourself to learn more advanced techniques, while not compromising on other factors that are neglected by many piano players.

We advise you begin with easy songs to learn on piano, but we do NOT advise that you get stuck on them. You should ideally be continually advancing your technique and repertoire as your playing ability improves.

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